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Edexcel IGCSE Chemistry Topic 1 - Principles Of Chemistry 




 Below is everything the examiners think you know, if you're not sure of something click on the link to watch my YouTube video explanation. For a copy of these you can print off, get the FREE revision guide I wrote for you.


 • I can write down the three states of matter

 • I can represent a solid, a liquid and a gas by drawing the arrangement of atoms

 • I can recall that energy is needed to change state

 • I can predict the state of a substance at a given temperature

 • I can name the changes between the states of matter, e.g. melting, condensing, evaporating, freezing, sublimation, deposition

 • I can illustrate a change of state in terms of drawing the particles

 • I can explain results of experiments involving the dilution of coloured solutions and diffusion of gases

 • I can define the terms solvent, solute, solution, saturated solution.

 • I can describe the term solubility

 • I can plot and describe solubility curves

 • I can describe an experiment into the solubility of a solid in water at specific temperatures

 • I can classify substances into elements, compounds or mixtures

 • I can define a pure substance and a mixture

 • I can describe each of the five separation techniques (filtration, chromatography, simple distillation, crystallisation, fractional distillation)

 • I can read and explain the results of a chromatogram

 • I can calculate Rf value and say what the value means

 • I can describe an experiment that identifies ink by paper chromatography 

 • I can define the terms atom and molecule

 • I can recall that all substances are made from atoms

 • I can recall the relative charges of the three subatomic particles

 • I can describe the structure of an atom

 • I can recall the relative size of an atom and a nucleus

 • I can recall the relative masses of the three subatomic particles

 • I can calculate relative atomic mass from abundances

 • I can use the periodic table to state the number of protons, electrons and neutrons in an element  Video 1  Video 2 

 • I can define the terms mass number and atomic number, isotopes and relative atomic mass

 • I can describe the arrangement of elements in the periodic table

 • I can recall the that periodic table shows the range of elements that are known to exist

 • I can interpret the symbols on the periodic table and use them to identify elements

 • I can work out the electron configuration for the first 20 elements

 • I can classify elements as metals and non-metals by their combining power

 • I can explain why atoms have no overall charge

 • I can describe an element as a metal or a non-metal based on its position in the periodic table

 • I can state how the Ef of an atom is related to its position on the periodic table

 • I can explain why elements in the same group have similar chemical properties

 • I can explain why noble gases do not react

 • I can represent a reaction using a word equation

 • I can represent a reaction using a balanced symbol equation  Video 1 Video 2 

 • I can calculate relative formula masses from relative atomic masses

 • I can state that the mole is the unit for the amount of a substance

 • I can calculate the masses of reactants and products using relative atomic mass, relative formula mass and amount of substances

 • I can calculate reacting masses using experimental data and chemical equations

 • I can calculate percentage yield

 • I can explain how to obtain the formulae of simple compounds

 • I can define the terms empirical formula and molecular formula 

 • I can calculate empirical and molecular formulae from experimental data

 • I can carry out calculations involving amount of substance, volume and concentration (in mol/dm3) of solution

 • I can carry out calculations involving gas volumes and the molar volume of a gas

 • I can determine the formulae of metal oxides created by combustion or reduction

 • I can describe how ions are formed

 • I can recall all the charges of these ions:

 • metals in Groups 1, 2 and 3

 • non-metals in Groups 5, 6 and 7 / Ag+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Zn2+ / hydrogen (H+), hydroxide (OH–), ammonium (NH4+), carbonate (CO32–), nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42–).

 • I can write formulae for compounds formed between the ions above

 • I can recall that ionic bonding occurs between a metal and a non-metal

 • I can describe the formation of ions

 • I can recall that metals will go on to form positive ions

 • I can recall the non-metals will go on to form negative ions

 • I can draw dot and cross diagrams to show ionic bonding in combinations between groups 1,2,3 and 5,6,7 showing only the outer electrons.

 • I can describe ionic bonding in terms of electrostatic attractions

 • I can describe why high melting and boiling points are a feature of giant ionic lattices

 • I can state that ionic compounds do not conduct electricity when solid, but do conduct when in solution or molten

 • I can recall that covalent bonding occurs between 2 non-metals and a result of electrostatic attractions

 • I can represent the bonding in covalent compounds as a dot and cross diagram (diatomic molecules including hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, halogens and hydrogen halides

 • inorganic molecules including water, ammonia and carbon dioxide

 • organic molecules containing up to two carbon atoms, including methane, ethane, ethene and those containing halogen atoms.)

 • I can draw covalent compounds using lines to represent electron pairs

 • I can recall the names and formula of common covalent compounds

 • I can recall that substances with a simple molecular structure are gases or liquids, or solids with low melting and boiling points

 • I can use the term ‘intermolecular forces of attraction’

 • I can explain why an increase in relative atomic mass results in an increase in melting and boiling points

 • I can recall that giant covalent structures are solids with high melting and boiling points

 • I can explain how the structures of graphite, C60 fullerene and diamond affect their physical properties

 • I can state that covalent compounds do not conduct electricity (other than water and graphite)

 • I can draw a metallic lattice

 • I can discuss metallic bonding

 • I can explain typical physical properties of metals

 • I can recall why covalent compounds do not conduct electricity

 • I can recall why ionic compounds conduct electricity only when molten or in aqueous solution

• I can use the terms anion and cation correctly

 • I can describe the following electrolysis experiments fully: / *Electrolysis of molten compounds (including lead(II) bromide)*Electrolysis of aqueous solutions (including sodium chloride,*dilute sulfuric acid and *copper(II) sulfate)  Video 1 Video 2 Video 3 Video 4  Video 5  Video 6

 • I can write ionic half-equations for electrolysis